Sing Street

Netflix Flim of the Week

“Mabs Does Movies” wants to bring you a recommendation from the two most popular streaming platforms every week (Netflix and Amazon Video) to indulge your binge watching ways. Here’s this week’s “Netflix Flim of the Week”.

Its the year 1985 in Dublin. 14 year old Connor Lawlor has just transferred to a free-state Catholic school because his parents need to cut back costs and can’t afford his current, more expensive education. His parents are fighting all the time and can’t stand the sight of each other. His older stoner brother is living at home after dropping out of college and his sister doesn’t really care about anything. His new school is terrible and he’s already been targeted by the school bully. After another terrible day at school, he sees over the road opposite the school gates a beautiful girl just standing on the steps of her house. Curious at the sight of this angel,  he goes up to her and asks her her name. She’s Raphina (17 years old) and she’s an aspiring model dreaming of moving to London to make it big. He wants to impress her so he asks her if she can star in his music video that he’s doing with his band. Only problem is that means creating an actual band and finding band members, naming the band, writing songs, and of course adding music to those lyrics…

And so begins the story of future indie classic “Sing Street”. Director John Carney is a master of portraying how music affects us. He showed it in his masterpiece “Once” (and still his best work), and did it again in “Begin Again”, and with his third musical act he hasn’t lost his touch. Carney has written and directed another  gorgeous film that echoes the great John Hughes coming-of-age movies from the 80s, with moments in this film that are pure magic. But it’s more than just a standard romantic movie between two teenagers (performed with perfection by our leads Ferdia Walsh-Peelo and Lucy Boynton). It’s a celebration of songwriting and how lyrics can emotionally affect us; motivate us in making life changing decisions. The soundtrack is perfection, with a mixture of original songs (written by Carney) and 80s classics from Duran Duran to The Cure. This great cast will make you laugh, cry, smile, and reflect. Watch it while its on Netflix.

 

 

Victoria

Netflix Flim of the Week

“Mabs Does Movies” wants to bring you a recommendation from the two most popular streaming platforms every week (Netflix and Amazon Video) to indulge your binge watching ways. Here’s this week’s “Netflix Flim of the Week”.

Black screen. House music plays in the background. Open shot of our protagonist Victoria, a young, beautiful Spanish woman in a nightclub in Berlin. Its 4am, she’s alone and she’s dancing by herself. The music is the drug she needs to feel alive. She takes a break and goes to the bar to order a shot. A good looking bartender serves her. She tries to chat him up but he doesn’t care. She looks disappointed, has the shot, and goes to the ladies bathroom. There’s a massive queue and she can’t be bothered to wait to use the stall. She’s tired, calls it a night and grabs her coat. She needs to open the cafĂ© in a few hours time and she needs some sleep. She gets interrupted by four German guys being kicked out of the club. One of them, Sonne, starts talking to her but the bouncer tells him and his friends to leave before he gets the chance to know anything about Victoria. She giggles, walks out of the club, and walks towards her bicycle. She sees the four guys again and Sonne goes straight up to her and starts charming her off her feet. He introduces her to his three friends and tells her that she needs to join them for one beer as its one of his friends’ birthday. Reluctant at first, she joins these four strangers for that drink…

And so begins the story of “Victoria”, a lonely Spanish girl ( played by the amazing Laia Costa) living in a city very alien to her, whos life changes one very early morning after a chance meeting with four strangers. I heard about this a year ago but never got the chance to see it when it was on limited release here in the UK. How great it was to stumble upon it on Netflix a few weeks ago while scrolling through the endless amount of content the platform has to offer. A stunning, tense thriller which twists and turns throughout its two-hour running time. What’s really special about it though is that the whole film is one single take (a technological achievement in itself), meaning the camera does not cut at anytime during the whole film; you are the 6th stranger with these characters on their night out. You feel like you’re having a drink with them or being the awkward 3rd wheel whenever there is an intimate scene. There’s not many films like it out there and its one I recommend you experiencing.